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Claar Cellar's Blog

Keep up to date with the latest news from Claar Cellars!

James Whitelatch
 
May 9, 2018 | James Whitelatch

New Vines

Controlling the direction of the growth is important in the new vines to give easy access for air flow management, sun management, and provide adequate support for stress-free vines. When young vines are being trained, the green tape helps to hold the two producing vines, or 'cordon', to the wire. Our smallest vines still have milk cartons around the base, which we use in lieu of snow banks to help keep the young vines insulated during the winter. We purchase end-run or over-stock milk cartons from various dairies, and the waxy paper stands up to the water and helps keep the vines protected from wind, snow, and nosy small animals. After two or three years the vines are strong enough, and the tattered milk cartons are collected, their work is done.

 

Time Posted: May 9, 2018 at 6:45 AM
Crista Whitelatch
 
February 15, 2018 | Crista Whitelatch

Spring is in the Air

Spring is in the air and with new bedding in our hawk-houses they have been receiving attention.  Rabbits are scurrying around the vineyard and the sun even shines every other day or so. Our vineyard crew has been hard at work in our vineyard for the new year. James has been on the tractor with the mechanical pre-pruner to cut the longest vines, but the vines still require hand pruning. The actual portion of the vines which produce the grapes are called 'canes', and these grow off the cordon as pictured on the older vines. We prune to two buds which gives us the best crop size for our vineyard and the choice and length of the pruning supports the size of the crop. In apples or other tree fruits, this type of management would be handled through thinning of blossoms later in the growing cycle. Once the grapes are producing we’ll also hand thin to make sure we have the best crop.

Time Posted: Feb 15, 2018 at 6:00 AM
Joe Hudon
 
November 13, 2017 | Joe Hudon

Next in the production of wine – Cap Management

Once the red wine is put into tanks and fermentation begins all of the solids—grape skins, pulp rise to the surface. This mass of solid matter is called must; however we refer to the floating section as “The Cap.” In order to maximize the extraction of color, flavor and structure we use one of several processes of cap management. There are many factors to consider when deciding how often to mix the cap, including the grape type, the growing season, fermentation temperature and whether or not the wine will have extended maceration. 

Punch down - is a gentle process of submerging the skins that forms over fermenting red wine in order to improve the extraction of color, flavor and tannin structure. Punch downs are initiated before the yeast is added during cold soaking and then performed 2 to 3 times daily until the end of fermentation and sometimes beyond if extended maceration post fermentation is necessary to improve the structure and color stability of the wine. Because punch downs are the gentlest form of cap management it is generally exclusive to our reserve tier wines. A lot of work goes in to punching down several small lot ferments two to three times each day and therefor this input is focused on our best wines.  

Pumpovers – This cap management method can be performed in a variety of ways. The process is to pump the juice from the racking valve, near the bottom of the tank, over the top of the tank and over the risen skins or cap.  You can fit an attachment to the top of the tank that can irrigate the cap mechanically, or you can pump it over manually by holding on to the hose and directing the flow of the wine to wet the entire surface of the cap.  This wetting process is where you maximize your extraction of flavor, color and texture.

Submerged Screen – This method involves installing a screen in the fermentation vessel to keep the cap submerged under the wine surface to maximize extraction.  This system is very gentle; however, it is important to note that the skins will be very compact under the screen and the extracts will be minimal.  Another cap management system will need to be incorporated to improve the extraction.  I have used this system along with 2 punch downs daily and am very happy with the effect.

 

Time Posted: Nov 13, 2017 at 10:16 AM
Joe Hudon
 
November 1, 2017 | Joe Hudon

Steps in Wine Production – Fermentation

After the destemmer the wine is pumped into tanks to begin fermentation. The process of fermentation in winemaking turns grape juice into an alcoholic beverage.

White wines are typically fermented without their skins and other solids, while red wines are fermented in contact with skins and other solids.

By putting grape juice into a container at the right temperature, adding yeast which turns the sugar in the juice into alcohol and carbon dioxide the grape juice will ferment.

During fermentation, yeasts transform sugars present in the juice into ethanol and carbon dioxide (as a by-product). The temperature and speed of fermentation are important considerations as well as the levels of oxygen present in the must at the start of the fermentation. The more sugars in the grapes the higher the potential alcohol level of the wine if the yeast is allowed to carry out fermentation to dryness.  We will stop fermentation in some cases early in order to leave some residual sugars and sweetness in the wine for example our Riesling. This can be achieved by dropping fermentation temperatures to the point where the yeast are inactive and then sterile filtering the wine to remove the yeast. 

Fermentation may be done in stainless steel tanks, in an open plastic vat or inside a wine barrel. All of our fermentation tanks are heated or cooled by a controlled glycol system that runs through jacketed tanks. Red wine fermentation requires temperatures to reach 78.8 - 86°F for the pigments to be extracted from the grape skins. It is common to warm the fermenting juice artificially to help this happen. This has to be done carefully, as yeast die quickly in the heat. White wine fermentation may require the fermenting juice to be cooled to 53.6 - 59°F to help preserve the delicate varietal characteristics. These flavor and aromatic compounds are destroyed in high temperatures. 

Time Posted: Nov 1, 2017 at 10:42 AM
Joe Hudon
 
September 27, 2017 | Joe Hudon

Winemaker’s Bloc Harvest and Production

On September 8th, 2 days after our Sauvignon Blanc was harvested, we harvested our Winemaker's Bloc Merlot. This fruit was crushed into 1 ton macro bins and allowed to settle for 24 hours. We will punch down the next day and add yeast to start the fermentation which will take about 10 days to complete to dryness which is the consumption of all of the sugar. We will then press the bins to a small vessel and then rack to barrels where the wine will undergo malic acid fermentation - the conversion of the harsh malic (apple) acid to smooth lactic (milk) acid. The wines will be racked 1-2 weeks post malolactic fermentation, eventually blended with other varietals and then aged for 1.5 to 2 years depending on flavor expression to make our signature 2017 Winemaker’s Bloc.

Time Posted: Sep 27, 2017 at 10:00 AM
Bob Whitelatch
 
June 20, 2017 | Bob Whitelatch

How We Handle Weeds in the Vineyard

We asked our Facebook friends “Do you know why we mow the weeds in our vineyard rows instead of having cleared the ground?

Here's our answer:

We keep row cover due to prevent wind erosion as well as habitat for beneficial insects and in the hopes cutworm stay in the weeds instead of crawling up the plants to eat grape buds in the spring.  With no center row irrigation, we allow the natural weeds that survive to be the cover crop. Part of our LIVE sustainable certification we limit the amount of raw materials (inputs such as pesticides, fertilizer, water, chemicals, fuel, etc.) used in vineyard and winery production. We strive to develop proactive and preventative, sustainable agricultural practices. These include the use of integrated pest management, beneficial cover crops, and manual weed control.

Time Posted: Jun 20, 2017 at 9:34 AM
Joe Hudon
 
May 24, 2017 | Joe Hudon

Tasting Notes

One of my favorite things about bottling is sitting down at the computer with a glass of wine to write tasting notes. I have 3 bottles to review on this amazing Wednesday. When the tough days of the job come around I just have to remind myself of the good ones.

Time Posted: May 24, 2017 at 2:48 PM
Joe Hudon
 
April 10, 2017 | Joe Hudon

Introducing: Winemaker's Bloc

The winemaking crew and I used our very best techniques in making our 2013 Winemaker’s Bloc Red Blend. We selected the best vineyard blocks from within the larger high-end vineyard blocks and hand managed these winemaker blocks in a way to achieve the highest possible quality of fruit. The fermenting wine was protected from oxygen to protect the delicate fruit of each varietal. I selected French oak barrels of the highest quality and managed the maturation process with frequent topping of barrel lots to minimize any head space in the barrels. The resulting wine is I believe truly the best that we can make from our Estate White Bluffs Vineyards and maybe the best wine that I have ever tasted. This wine contains the attributes of a world class wine and will peak in quality with 10 to 20 years of additional aging. I am very excited and proud to release to the public this amazing Washington State White Bluffs vineyard wine of a paramount quality that is rarely found.

Time Posted: Apr 10, 2017 at 12:52 PM